Data Science Tidbits

Here are some interesting data science nuggets that I thought were interesting for a mid-January day…

The first comes from TechMASH about data science being the next big thing.  The primary nugget of note is that the supply of employees with the needed skills as data scientists – those people who really understand how to pull relevant information out of data reliably – is going to have a tough time meeting demand.  Here’s an interesting infographic on the current disconnects – for example, while 37% of “business intelligence” professional studied business in school, 42% of today’s “data scientists” studied computer science, engineering, and natural sciences.  This highlights the increasing demand for students that have solid mathematics backgrounds – it’s becoming more about knowing how you pull information from data, regardless of application.

Don’t get me wrong – to be effective applying data science, you need two things:  a subject matter expert that understands what makes sense and what doesn’t, and someone who really understands data to pull out the information.  Sometimes that can reside within one person, but it’s rare and takes many years of training to acquire the necessary excellence in both fields.   And as the demands for data analysis grow, these two areas will likely form into distinct disciplines with interesting partnership opportunities being created.

The definition of data science is still being defined, but I’m convinced it will have huge impact in the next five years.  And while the science aspects of data are starting to be defined, the engineering aspects of data and analytics are truly in their infancy…

On the same thread, here’s a Forbes article by Tom Groenfeldt on the need for data scientists, or Excel jockeys, or whatever they will be called in the future.  For some companies, the move to “data science” is quite apparent, but for others, the current assemblance of business professionals that have figured out the ins-and-outs of Excel spreadsheets work quite well.  This is likely a snapshot of where things are today, but I do believe that as the questions we ask of the data get more complicated, we will clearly see the need for a more rigorous science-based discipline to data wrangling…

The last tidbit is from the Wall Street Journal about the healthcare field being the next big area for Big Data.  I do think that healthcare is ripe for leveraging data, and I’ve written other posts on the subject.  One former Chief Medical Officer that I spoke with mentioned that one of the big problems is just getting the data useable in the first place.  He said that, as of today, 85% of all medical records are still in paper form.  The figure seems a bit high to me, but I don’t really know how many patient records in various individual doctor’s offices are still sitting in folders on shelves. 

There has been a big push lately, spurred by financial support from the U.S government, for upgrading to electronic health records (EHR).   This will help to solve the data collection problem – if you can’t get data into an electronic format, you can’t utilize information technologies to pull information out of the data.

I serve as Director of Data Science & Analytics Engineering at Areté Associates. I've also served in leadership positions with Elanix, Inc. (now Agilent Technologies) and Mentor Graphics. I live in Thousand Oaks, CA, where I've served the public as Chair of our city's Planning Commission and our county's Tobacco Settlement Allocation Committee. I have been married to my wife Stephanie since 1993, and we have a wonderful daugther Monroe. Learn more about me »

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