Bad Science

Jen Rhee has done some great homework on bad science and put them into a cool infographic that’s worth looking at.  Here are some of the highlights from her research into bad science:

  • 1 in 3 scientists admit to using questionable research practices
  • 1 in 50 admits falsifying or fabricating data outright
  • Among biomedical researcher trainees at UC-San Diego, 81% said they would modify or fabricate results to win a grant or publish a paper

This is obvious disturbing, and worth highlighting to try and root these things out.  Science is about finding the truth – no matter what it is – and as more businesses start using data science in order to drive business outcomes, we need to make sure that science is about being honest – with the truth and with ourselves.

The scientific method was developed to provide the best way to figure out what the truth is, given the data we’ve got.  It doesn’t make perfect decisions (no method can), but it’s the best method available.

Real scientists (the ones not highlighted in Jen’s research) care about what the data is actually saying and discovering the truth.  When someone cares about something else other than the truth (money, celebrity, fame, etc.), then bad science is what you get.  Of course, when there are people involved, sometimes the truth isn’t the top priority.

Great infographic, Jen!  You can find it here

I serve as Director of Data Science & Analytics Engineering at Areté Associates. I've also served in leadership positions with Elanix, Inc. (now Agilent Technologies) and Mentor Graphics. I live in Thousand Oaks, CA, where I've served the public as Chair of our city's Planning Commission and our county's Tobacco Settlement Allocation Committee. I have been married to my wife Stephanie since 1993, and we have a wonderful daugther Monroe. Learn more about me »

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