Beating Cancer and Favoritism with Data

Fortune-Startup RisingI read a couple of items in this month’s Fortune magazine that I thought it was worth passing along.

The first was a small article by Brian Dumaine about the work being done at Applied Proteomics to identify cancer before it develops.  At Applied Proteomics, they use mass spectroscopy to capture and catalog 360,000 different pieces of protein found in blood plasma, and then let supercomputers crunch on the data to identify anomalies associated with cancer.  The company has raised $57 million in venture capital and is backed by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen.  You can read the first bit of the article here.

The second is from the Word Check callout, showing how access to information is making the word a better place:

wasa: Pronounced [wah-SUH]

(noun) Arabic slang:  A display of partiality toward a favored person or group without regard for their qualifications.  A system that drives much of life in the Middle East — from getting into a good school to landing a good job.

But on the Internet, there is no wasa.

- Adapted from Startup Rising: The Entrepreneurial Revolution Remaking the Middle East by Christopher M. Schroeder

I serve as Director of Data Science & Analytics Engineering at Areté Associates. I've also served in leadership positions with Elanix, Inc. (now Agilent Technologies) and Mentor Graphics. I live in Thousand Oaks, CA, where I've served the public as Chair of our city's Planning Commission and our county's Tobacco Settlement Allocation Committee. I have been married to my wife Stephanie since 1993, and we have a wonderful daugther Monroe. Learn more about me »

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

  • Dave Morse

    Hi Mic! In Japanese, it’s called “jinmyaku” (genemeaku–connections). Hope that your adjustment to the Big Apple is going well.

  • Dave Morse

    Using super computers to detect cancer cells is encouraging news indeed. To what extent can such technology be used to analyze the interface between the immune system and oncogenes?

  • http://www.micfarris.com/ Mic Farris

    I am sure that technology will help in these and any other problems. As we learn more and more about how the world works, we will be able to use the data we collect and leverage it for good uses. Thanks for staying in touch, Dave!